Jun 8 • 18M

Ep. 132 - Examining Some Peculiar Contradictions

Is what scientists know about monkeypox changing faster than the story can keep up?

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Is everyone okay with this?

Scanning the headlines today, there are some very peculiar contradictions concerning the MONKEY POX:

  • The left-leaning DrudgeReport indicates that there are now 300 cases of monkeypox in the United States, and expresses concern that the virus is silently spreading because people are not testing for it—and because there are rumors that the virus is now airborne:

  • The right-leaning FoxNews confirms that the CDC has raised the monkeypox alert to Level 2, and is once again recommending people wear masks when they travel. They report that as of June 3rd, there are only 21 confirmed cases of monkeypox, but also claim the virus is likely spreading undetected as an STD.

  • As of Wednesday, June 7, 2022, the CDC.gov website reports there are a total of 35 confirmed cases spread throughout 15 different states. If the case count jumped from 21 confirmed to 35 confirmed cases, that would be a 66% increase in the number of infections in less than a week, spreading through all corners of the country, even though the CDC still maintains it only spreads through close contact, like an STD.

What’s the real story with monkeypox? Is it just another head-fake headline, or is this something people should worry about? How did the virus suddenly and very rapidly spread around the globe if it’s only spread via close contact? How did the virus evolve to become airborne, and could this have anything to do with restricted research being conducted by government agencies?

Here are a few more questions I have about monkeypox:

  1. Why was the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommending pre-exposure prophylaxis with a “replication-competent live virus” vaccine for orthopoxviruses in 2015, when the eradication of smallpox was achieved in 1980?

  2. Could these vaccines, which were labeled ACAM2000 and known to have severe side effects, have been “leaky vaccines” that lead to viral shedding? Or is it possible that a modified virus could have somehow escaped the lab because they were “increasingly being used” in a wide range of biomedical research?

  3. In September 2019, the FDA approved yet another new vaccine for smallpox and monkeypox (JYNNEOS), which was shown to have fewer Severe Adverse Reactions than ACAM2000—even though the CDC documented more than 20 clinical studies showing adverse reactions. How is this justified?

Reading through the footnotes on the CDC evaluation of the monkeypox vaccine reveals the fact that the prolific use of the these viruses have led to numerous unintentional infections, noting that these “occupational exposures” have led to cases wherein, “morbidity has not been insignificant.” We also learn that experimenting with these viruses in a laboratory “can cause clinical infection in humans as well as produce infectious virus that can be transmitted to others.

Here’s another fun fact:

After testing the JYNNEOS monkeypox vaccine on rats and rabbits, they then tested it on non-human primates — aka, actual monkeys. How did they expose these monkeys to the monkeypox virus? According to the FDA, they were infected intravenously (by jabbing them with a needle), using the intratracheal method (by shoving it down their throat), and last but not least, by delivering the monkeypox virus via aerosol.

I’m not a scientist, but doesn’t delivery of the monkeypox virus via aerosol imply that the virus can be spread via aerosol? How can that be, given the spread of monkeypox, like chickenpox and smallpox, is known to be spread through close contact? It’s never wise to jump to conclusions, but these three government funded research articles struck me as suspicious:

Turns out, to understand the potential threat of a weaponized monkeypox virus, these brilliant scientists weaponized the virus. They even proved that the MPXV virus could “retain infectivity in aerosols for more than 90 hours.

Thus, my mind wanders back to the barrage of sensational headlines blaring that now “Monkeypox May Sometimes Spread Through the Air” — even though just weeks ago, Andrea McCollum, the CDC’s leading expert on monkeypox, said to the world that monkeypox transmission requires “really close sustained contact.” Evidentially she didn’t get the memo, because the story is changing quickly:

This observation indicates that Dr. McCollum’s expertise is being white-washed in a deluge of gripping propaganda, which is being orchestrated in concert with the CDC’s freshest capitulations regarding masking guidelines, and there is no doubt that all of this will make its way onto the stage of the midterm political theater. Let’s not forget Dr. Jha’s prescient words: Fear spreads faster than disease.

By now the wise realize that that is all part of the plan.