Apr 26 • 18M

Ep. 103 - Poking The Russian Bear

Why the war in Ukraine is not what you think.

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Intelligent views on headline news.
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Exactly two months ago, after conducting extensive research and preparing the Ukraine Special Report, I presented Patriot Club members with 10 pages of historical context and political considerations that cast an entirely different light on the Russia-Ukraine narrative. Revealing the long history of regional tension, rooted in the collapse of the Soviet Union, the report explores how western forces have been trying to stake their claim in Ukraine for decades.

After a series of suspicious "revolutions" -- like the Orange Revolution in 2004 and the Revolution of Dignity in 2014 -- it became clear that the Ukrainian people were deeply divided over maintaining their own independence, versus forfeiting sovereignty and joining the European Union. Obviously there were very powerful global forces pulling for the  latter, including the U.S. government. That the West wants Ukraine is no secret.

Since the writing of the February 26th report, I've been looking at the Russia-Ukraine headlines from a different angle.  Isn't it interesting that after several weeks of being bombarded and invaded by the Russians, President Zelensky was still not willing to join with NATO? Could it be that the majority of the Ukrainian people feel more threatened by a western takeover, than by a Russian takeover? I have suspected from the start that the EU, UN, and the US -- who are the seat of the global elite, hellbent on taking over the world -- are actually the ones who are up to no good.

Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying that Putin is innocent, or that Russia isn't bombing innocent civilians. What I'm saying is that there is more to the story -- that the real power struggle at play is between those who want global control, and the Russian Bear who is not easily controlled.

With that backdrop, almost two months later, here are a few articles that shed light on the situation:

Other major headlines out of the Ukraine that have captivated the mainstream media include the sinking of the Moskva and what has become known as the Bucha Massacre.  As with virtually every other story spinning out of the chaos in eastern Europe, both of these stories have compelling counter-narrative perspectives.

Was the sinking of the Moskva a brilliant military strike against the flagship of Russia's Black Sea Fleet? Or was she an old boat that was set to be decommissioned, but proved to be an easy target for rudimentary missiles that were being guided by U.S. provided stealth drones? Or, even more intriguing, could this have been clandestine espionage conducted by a saboteur embedded on the vessel? Or could this have simply been a mechanical failure on a warship that's been in service for over 40 years?

Was the horror of dead bodies being left to rot in the streets of Bucha a scene of barbaric Russian brutality? Or were these the bodies of Ukrainian's who had sided with the Russians but were executed by the Ukrainian forces when they re-entered the city? Were people executed with hands bound behind their back, or could these pictures have been staged postmortem to provoke a more compelling narrative and provide more proof of Russian tyranny?

In the midst of conflicting information and irreconcilable story lines, it is impossible to know what is really going on in Ukraine. It may be helpful to frame the entire situation as a battle between competing psy-ops. This is a war of propaganda, and both sides are vying for your sympathies. They want your emotional support. They want your financial support. They want your moral support. They want you to believe they are the good guys -- but are they?

Maybe it's pure speculation, but doesn't it seem like the West has been repeatedly poking the bear? Some astute observers have pointed out the possibility that the West actually needs WWIII to finish pulling off the Great Reset. With that consideration in mind, several pieces seem to click into place -- but we'll save that discussion for next time!